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TAG: UHDTV

Ultra-high-definition television (also known as Ultra HD television, Ultra HD, UHDTV, UHD and Super Hi-Vision) today includes 4K UHD and 8K UHD, which are two digital video formats that were first proposed by NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories and later defined and approved by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).[1][2][3][4]

The Consumer Electronics Association announced on October 17, 2012, that “Ultra High Definition”, or “Ultra HD”, would be used for displays that have an aspect ratio of 16:9 or wider and at least one digital input capable of carrying and presenting native video at a minimum resolution of 3840×2160 pixels.[5][6] In 2015, the Ultra HD Forum was created to bring together the end-to-end video production ecosystem to ensure interoperability and produce industry guidelines so that adoption of Ultra-high-definition television could accelerate. From just 30 in Q3 2015, the forum published a list up to 55 commercial services available around the world offering 4K resolution.[7]

The “UHD Alliance”, an industry consortium of content creators, distributors, and hardware manufacturers, announced during CES 2016 press conference its “Ultra HD Premium” specification, which defines resolution, bit depth, color gamut, high-dynamic-range imaging(HDRI) and rendering (HDRR) required for Ultra HD (UHDTV) content and displays to carry their Ultra HD Premium logo (seen to the right).[8][9][10][11][12]

 

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Projects with this TAG (3)

Active project

4K, the evolution of Television

The prospects for a new way of watching TV

More pixels or best quality pixels? The problems of a higher resolution signal against an improved quality signal. The challenges of Rai and Reserch Centre towards a high technical quality television.

Active project

High Dynamic Range

The evolution of television signal: same definition, best pixels

The High Dynamic Range allows a significantly improved image. The pixels that compose the image are high quality compared to the current pixels, with more information content. The signal reproduced on the new HDR screens is more dynamic and therefore with a much higher brightness, as well as with a superior detail perception.

Active project

Beyond HDTV

Rai, and in particular the Research Centre, has always contributed to the testing and standardization of new technologies to ensure improved image quality and greater involvement of the viewer in the scene.